World Language Standards

  • World Languages units consist of the following 7 thematic units of study:

    Unit 1 – All About Me
    Unit 2 – School Days
    Unit 3 – Home, Sweet, Home
    Unit 4 – Food, Glorious Food
    Unit 5 – Celebrations!  
    Unit 6 – Migratory Animals
    Unit 7 – Going
    Green

    World Languages

    The New Jersey Student Learning Standards – World Languages (NJSLS-WL) is a guiding document toward participation in the state’s global society. As one of the most diverse states in the United States, New Jersey encompasses a multicultural, global citizenry. In all regions, there are people speaking and interacting with others in different languages; there are street signs in several languages and international enterprises conducting business in English and in a multitude of other languages. The New Jersey Department of Education, whose mission is to equip students with necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to participate successfully in the 21st century, embraces the state’s multiculturalism and diversity, including the acquisition of diverse languages and cultures.

     Mission

    World languages education provides learners with the essential language skills and cultural understandings in languages other than English necessary to live and work in a global, culturally diverse world.

     Vision

    An education in world languages fosters a population that: • Cultivates communication and cultural understanding in more than one language with the levels of language proficiency that are required to function in a variety of occupations and careers in the contemporary workplace. • Exhibits attitudes, values, and skills that indicate a positive disposition and understanding of cultural differences and that enhances cross-cultural communication. • Participates in local and global communities with people who speak languages other than English to address social justice issues and other global problems. • Values language learning for its long-term worth in advancing personal, work-related, and/or financial success in our increasingly interconnected world.

    Intent and Spirit of the World Languages Standards

    The study of world languages benefits all students by fostering academic success, cognitive flexibility, increased access to information from other content areas, employment opportunities, and the ability to function more effectively with understanding and respect in all environments encountered in their lives. To meet the high school graduation requirement ---(N.J.A.C. 6A: 8:5.1), the New Jersey Student Learning Standards –

    World Languages Practices

    The practices are the skills that individuals who leverage their ability to speak multiple languages in their careers use on a regular basis. Because the purpose of World Languages is to provide students with the essential language skills and cultural understandings in languages other than English, many of the practices can be applied to daily life. These practices establish a strong link between communication and culture, which is applied when making connections and comparisons and in using language to function as part of local and global communities. Curriculum writers and educators will want to consider how they can design learning experiences that will enable their students to develop these skills in conjunction with the skills reflected in the core ideas and performance expectations (ACTFL, 2012).

    Communicate effectively in more than one language in order to function in a variety of situations and for multiple purposes.

    Cultures Learners use the language to investigate, explain, and reflect on the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the cultures studied. Learners use the language to investigate, explain, and reflect on the relationship between the products and perspectives of the cultures studied.

    Connections Learners use the language to investigate, explain, and reflect on the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own. Learners use the language to investigate, explain, and reflect on the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.

    Comparisons Develop insight into the nature of language and culture in order to interact with cultural competence.

    Communities Learners use the language both within and beyond the classroom to interact and collaborate in their community and the globalized world. Learners set goals and reflect on their progress in using languages for enjoyment, enrichment, and advancement.

    Language Proficiency Levels

    Unlike other content areas, the NJSLS – WL is benchmarked by proficiency levels. In this iteration of version, the performance expectations for all three modes of communication are displayed in one document according to proficiency level. Below is a chart from ACTFL Performance Descriptors for Language Learners (2012) that shows how assessing for performance is different from assessing for proficiency. The ultimate goal of world language instruction is for learners to attain high levels of proficiency, which allows them to use the language with ease and confidence in everyday interactions with native speakers and in the workplace. To attain proficiency, learners learn, use, and practice language that they acquire in a classroom setting. Spiraling and recursive performance in a world language leads to proficiency.

     

    Performance is defined as how well a learner uses language acquired in a classroom setting. 

    Proficiency is defined as the spontaneous use of language in real-world situations that might occur when: interacting with native speakers of the language, or immersed in a target language environment.

    The following guidelines describe what individuals can do with language when speaking, writing, listening, and reading in real-life situations in spontaneous and non-rehearsed contexts (ACTFL, 2012). The guidelines identify five major levels of proficiency: Novice, Intermediate, Advanced, Superior, and Distinguished.

    • Novice Low: Students communicate using words and phrases that are memorized and practiced when talking about very familiar topics related to self, family, friends, school and home.

    • Novice Mid: Students communicate using memorized words and some phrases to talk about familiar topics related to school, home, and the community.

    • Novice High: Students communicate using words, lists, and simple sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes

    • Intermediate Low: Students communicate using simple sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes

    • Intermediate Mid: Students communicate using strings of sentences to ask and answer questions, to handle simple transactions related to everyday life, and to talk about subject matter studied in other classes.

    • Intermediate High: Students communicate using connected sentences and paragraphs to handle complicated situations on a wide-range of topics.

    • Advanced Low: Students communicate using paragraph-level discourse to handle complicated situations on a wide-range of topics.

    Disciplinary Concepts

    1. Interpretive Mode of Communication

    In the Interpretive mode of communication, students demonstrate understanding of spoken and written communication within appropriate cultural contexts. Examples of this kind of one-way reading or listening include cultural interpretations of printed texts, videos, online texts, movies, radio and television broadcasts, and speeches. Beyond the Novice level, “interpretation” differs from “comprehension” because it implies the ability to read or listen “between the lines” and “beyond the lines.”

    Proficiency Level

    • Novice Low

    • Novice Mid

    • Novice High

    • Intermediate Low

    • Intermediate Mid

    • Intermediate High

    • Advanced Low

    Learning a language involves interpreting meaning from listening, viewing, and reading culturally authentic materials in the target language.

    1. Interpersonal Mode of Communication

    In the Interpersonal mode of communication, students engage in direct oral and/or written communication with others. Examples of this “two-way” communication include conversing face-to-face, participating in online discussions or videoconferences, instant messaging and text messaging, and exchanging personal letters or e-mail messages.

    • Novice Low

    • Novice Mid

    • Novice High

    • Intermediate Low

    • Intermediate Mid

    • Intermediate High

    • Advanced Low

    Core Idea---Interpersonal communication between and among people is the exchange of information and the negotiation of meaning

    Intermediate Mid • Intermediate High • Advanced Low

    Core Idea---Speakers and writers gain confidence and competence as they progress along the proficiency continuum.

    ACTFL (American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages) has guidelines for speaking, and preliminary guidelines for writing. The ACTFL scale goes up only to the Superior level.

    ACTFL’s goal is 90% in the Target Language---  ACTFL

    1. Presentational Mode of Communication

     In the Presentational mode of communication, students present, orally and/or in writing, information, concepts and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers with whom there is no immediate interaction. Examples of this one-to-many mode of communication include a presentation to a group, posting an online video or webpage, creating and posting a podcast or videocast, and writing an article for a newspaper.

    Proficiency Level

    • Novice Low

    • Novice Mid

    • Novice High

    • Intermediate Low

    • Intermediate Mid

    • Intermediate High

    • Advanced Low

     Core Idea--- Presentational communication involves presenting information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

     Core Idea---Speakers and writers gain confidence and competence as they progress along the proficiency continuum.